Historia del VoleibolARTÍCULO SOBRE ANA MOSER

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ARTÍCULO SOBRE ANA MOSER

Mensaje #1 por cuba » 30 Dic 2013, 03:55

Un articulo en Ingles sobre Ana Moser y su historia.

http://bbs.sjtu.edu.cn/bbstcon?board=volleyball&reid=1186665480

Simply speaking, Ana Beatriz Moser has been the most famous and talented Brazilian volleyball player of the last two decades. She is to Brazil what Mireya Luis was to Cuba and Lang Ping will always be to China. There are few other analogies that are quite as appropriate because these players combined popular appeal, a strong character, impressive volleyball skills, and a natural inclination towards leadership, all under one name. Ana Moser's story is quite long and quite interesting. Check out her own personal website for the complete story (see the Links section). But as far as my impressions of this talented player go, here they are—in a decompressed nutshell! What I will most remember about her is the way she faced the Cubans in Atlanta. The memory of her bravery gave me enormous respect for her, and not only because she stood up to uphold her battered dignity, but because she didn't think twice about doing it. Most of her teammates were unsure of how to handle the loss so they huddled together by the back line in silence, but in a most daring move, Ana Moser went straight to the front line and faced her demons right in their faces. How many people pick a fight in front of thousands of spectators at the Omni Colliseum, millions of TV viewers tuned in to the semifinal, and even more so, at the Olympic Games of all places, where surely the incident would make it into the annals of history? However, her reaction didn't surprise me from what I've seen of this talented Brazilian player and her on-court personality: she's definitely not the type of person you want to mess with. I remember that in the finals of the South American Club Championships in Lima in '94 or '95 (where she played for Colgate/S?o Caetano against L'Acqua di Fiori/Minas) she would constantly glare at someone on the other side of the net, I don't know really at who. Whenever a call was obvious but the referees wouldn't see it, Ana Moser would provokingly lift her hands at this player as if telling her, "Come on, admit you touched the ball! What? Are you gonna pretend you didn't touch it? You want this to get nasty? 'cause I can make it nasty if you want to..."—that type of attitude. Some people might call it arrogant, but Ana Moser definitely knew how to make herself be heard on the court. Even amongst her teammates, she strutted around the court with a confidence that made her seem almost manly (I'm not saying this in a bad way at all), like a boy looking for a fight. For Brazilians and fans of Ana Moser anywhere in the world, this self-confidence was irresistible, and as long as she didn't cross the line into downright bullying, it was admired. So how did this affect my perception of her at Atlanta? Well, before Ana Moser was a player of international caliber, the continental rivalry in South America was between Brazil and my home country, Peru. These two teams battled it out since the mid-1960s, if not further back, and until the late 1970s it was quite even. But the '80s were mostly Peruvian, winning all five titles of that decade but one in Santo André, Brazil, in 1981. Speaking in general, I'm sure that when Ana Moser began watching international volleyball competitions she was quite frustrated at the fact that Brazil would never play its best against Peru, for some bizarre reason. The Brazilian teams of the '80s were good teams, creative, athletic, gutsy, and with talent aplenty in a country of 150 million people, but somehow they were intimidated whenever they faced Cecilia Tait and Company. That was back in the '80s. Ana Moser probably entered volleyball determined to reverse the continental order of things... She quickly rose up the ranks from club to Junior National Team, and in '87 she led Brazil to its first World Junior title against South Korea. I don't remember exactly but my Brazilian friends tell me that Márcia and Fernanda were also on that team. Ana Moser, was the go-to hitter in that Junior World Champion team. and with that world title in her hand, she knew she had it in her to win many more in the Adult division. Two years later at the '89 Junior World's, her teammates Márcia and Fernanda won a second consecutive Junior World title, this time alongside Ana Flávia, Ericleia (Filo), Kerly, and Fátima, but their final match was tougher than that of '87. Brazil faced a Cuban team with players such as Magaly Carvajal and Regla Bell, two players who were to become hard core adversaries in just three year's time. Ana Moser didn't play at the '89 World's because she was over the age limit, but she waited eagerly for the arrival of her world bi-champion teammates so that the Adult National Team could begin a major upgrade. At the '89 South American Championships in Curitiba, coach Inaldo Manta (or at least I believe it was him at the time) played around with his lineup throughout the tournament, mixing the old and new generations to achieve a sort of productive symbiosis. I stress the difference between the two groups because other than Isabel Salgado (later on called the "Ana Moser of her generation", in converse chronological adulation), the older players weren't really at a par with the younger ones. It seems odd to say that, but I think that if more of the younger players had played, they would've obtained better results. Instead, Brazil dropped a set against Argentina and fell flat against Peru in the final. Ana Moser played for barely a handful of points in the match, but whenever she attacked she would hit the ball really well! Benching her, putting Vera Mossa on the outside instead, and having Márcia and Ana Claudia play middle (??) seemed like mistakes that a coach with too many options was making. But at least the younger players got some real experience playing, which is something Peru's coach Man Bok Park was not doing at all on the other side of the net... Eventually, Park's reluctance to put his juniors to the test cost him the continental hegemony. At the '90 Goodwill Games in Seattle, it became clear to me that Brazil had surpassed Peru. By then Peru depended more and more on middle blocker and star hitter Gaby Pérez del Solar. In the match for third place, Brazil faced Peru for third place and showed some really exceptional volleyball in the first two sets. Nothing was working for Peru, they were sluggish, they were hitting straight into the blocks of Ida and Ana Flávia, and the two outside hitters, Ana Moser and Márcia, were unstoppable. The Brazilian coach, Inaldo Manta (now I'm sure it was him) brought Tina Lopes back for her quickness at middle (despite her not being very tall for a middle blocker). For the same reason he placed Ida at middle, so setter Fernanda had quite a number of fast combination plays to run in the middle, or the outside hitters in looped shoots outside, or Ana Moser to the back row. Unfortunately in the third set, Ana Flávia went down with a sprained ankle and that shifted the momentum of the match in favour of Peru. The Andeans won sets three and four, taking advantage of a disconcerted Brazilian team that was struggling to find itself again. In the tie-break, Peru went up to 14-11 and apparently had the match, the bronze medal, and a fiercely punctuated "Not yet!" at any Brazilian hopes that they had taken the lead in their classic rivalry. But if there was one player who wasn't going to let fate play its cards out as usual, that player was Ana Moser. A couple of Peruvian mistakes, and a key roof by Márcia brought Brazil to 14. But the real soul of the team was Ana, who gathered her teammates after every point and motivated them to concentrate, to expect the ball to go to Gaby, to cover any dinks by Rosa, and to believe in themselves—We haven't swum so far to die on the beach! She brought added confidence to the team by slamming a very angled cross court kill to get to match point. While Peru called a time-out, Ana Moser pulled the team together again, to which I think the coach let her speak for she was really pumping her teammates. Then Márcia served, Peru attacked, and the ball fell in between two Peruvian players like a bubble. The Brazilians went wild. They had just exorcised one of their greatest demons, finding the guts within the unity of the team to not underperform against their traditional rival. They had been on the verge of an all too familiar outcome, but Ana Moser and the new Brazilian generation resoundingly replied, "Not anymore!" Despite a mediocre placing at the Adult World Championships in China some months later, Ana Moser made a name for herself by being awarded a prize for the Best Attack of the tournament, a great honour indeed given her competition: China's Lang Ping, the USSR's Irina Smirnova, Cuba's Mireya Luis, and the USA's Caren Kemner, among other very talented hitters. At the '91 Pan-American Games in Havana, she again led her teammates to displace Peru from their usual trip to the final, and instead faced Cuba on their home court, on a typically hot Caribbean night. Brazil couldn't win it, and in the defeat they recognised some familiar faces in the Cuban team from the Junior ranks that were quickly racing to the élite of world-class volleyball. The rivalry would shift soon from Peru to Cuba, but first, Ana Moser needed to prove to herself once again that Brazil had vanquished those ghosts from the '80s by defeating Peru for the South American berth to the '92 Olympics. It helped that the match was played in an all-yellow living mass of a coliseum in Ibirapuera, S?o Paulo, with a torcida that never stopped cheering, and a team that had grown stronger and more united with every match. On a day they will surely remember, Brazil defeated Peru in four sets, and with that, earned their ticket to the Olympic Games in Barcelona. Not only had Brazil dethroned the Olympic Vice-champion from '88, but they had high expectations given the enormous talent they were taking to Spain. There was one major change, though, and that was the hiring of Wadson Lima in place of former coach Inaldo Manta, who had committed suicide and left the team grieving for what was the tragic end of a good person's life. This painful experience probably brought the team even closer together, because Barcelona saw more Brazilian unity than usual (especially between Hilma and Ana Moser, who had a rocky Natalia—Cecilia type of internal relationship, as I heard). Though Wadson Lima's coaching left a lot to be desired (in my opinion), the team did well against The Netherlands (3-1) and China (15-11 in the tie-break), but couldn't defeat Cuba (1-3). Still, they qualified for the quarterfinals and defeated Japan in four sets to go into the semifinals. The Unified Team (former USSR and defending Olympic Champion) however, impeded Brazil's passage into the finals in four sets, and in the bronze medal, the South Americans faced a demoralised USA, who were coming right off a 5 set loss to Cuba. But even though Brazil lost to the USA in straight sets, the USAmerican press had much to say about Ana Moser's spectacular playing. They praised her as "the only Brazilian with any spunk" (not entirely true but still a worthy observation for Ana), and the most fluently bilingual player on her team (a blessing for reporters come time for press conferences). Surely, she was the most consistent player on her team, and Fernanda kept setting her high outside balls which Ana tooled, or hit down the line again and again, as if Paula Weishoff weren't even there. It took guts, definitely, but in the end Elaina Oden and Caren Kemner got the best of her by blocking her for match point. Still, Ana Moser was named the Best Server of the tournament for her deadly jump serve which only got better with time. She shone in Barcelona, and the future for her looked like Stardom deluxe. Unfortunately, as happens to many athletes, injuries befall even the fittest, and Ana Moser was forced to leave the game for a while. Brazil had to go to the '93 Grand Prix and the South American Championship in Peru that same year without its star hitter. A fourth place at the GP and a second place in Peru showed how valuable Ana Moser was to her team. Had she played, Brazil would've medaled at the GP and probably would've won the continental title. But Ana Moser had to wait until the following year's Grand Prix to show the world that she was back. With Ana's knee not giving her problems anymore, and with a new and much better coach in Bernardo Rezende (the popular Bernardinho), Brazil had an added incentive to perform extra-well at the '94 World Championships that they were hosting. Winning the '94 GP helped boost Brazil's confidence, even though they defeated a Mireya-less Cuban squad. With all the Brazilian players in optimal shape, the excitement level within the team and the country at extraordinary levels, and a coach that re-invigorated the team with some dynamic men's elements and more creativity than his predecessor ever ventured into, Brazil was sure that it would medal and medal well. The '94 World's was a very exciting competition (except for the Cuban matches which all ended in pummelling straight sets). Brazil faced some competition from South Korea—the surprise semifinalist—but then easily reached the semifinal against a young, tall, kasha-fed Russian team that crushed balls set up 20 metres in the air. Hopes of reaching the final almost faded when Russia took a 2-1 lead and shot upwards in the 4th, but then the Brazilian machine slowly began grinding, and with the help of the torcida (also known as "the seventh player" in Brazil) Ana Moser and Company woke up from the menace of a possible defeat and completely dominated the match from there on. Instrumental in this comeback was Fernanda, who began distributing sets very well in order to evade the tall Russian block. Ana Moser completed the process of becoming a national hero in that match, for she sent Brazil and the colliseum in Ibirapuera into a frenzy by pounding kill after kill until the end of the match. It was incredible how even bump setting backwards, Fernanda's sets went perfectly to Ana who had no difficulty banging the ball on Russia's court. One of the balls even hit Russian Valentina Ogienko's foot without the experienced player even having time to react! With this level of confidence, Brazil went into the final versus Cuba a very invigorated team. Memories of the final, however, eclipse those wonderful ones from the semifinal against Russia. Cuba never gave Brazil a chance, save for some sequences in the second set, and it literally pummeled the hosts with a flat 3-0. Carvajal was a monster at the net, stuff blocking Hilma more times than not, Ana Moser from the back row, Ana Paula's quick middle hits, and Edna for championship point. The go-to hitter role shifted, from Ana Moser to Márcia and later to Ana Flávia with her effective slides. But the feeling of impotence visibly bothered Ana Moser. Here she was on centre stage in her own country, and all she could see were Cuban arms in the horizon. This was very uncharacteristic of a fearless hitter like her, but somehow the Cubans could read her every move, and in front of a yellow-clad crowd, Cuba won its second world title since '78 in Leningrad. There were inklings of a nascent rivalry in this match because after every kill, captain Mireya would stare her opponents down and yell at them. Soon captain Ana Flávia started doing the same in retaliation. The referee had to talk to both captains to calm things down, but the rivalry had already been triggered, and Ana Moser did not like what she was seeing. True, Cuba was flawless in this tournament by not losing a single set, but she didn't like the fact that they were provoking the Brazilians in such a disparaging way. This night in S?o Paulo became unfinished business for Ana Moser. From the '94 World's to the Atlanta Olympics, something didn't go right for Ana Moser. She was hindered by more injuries and her rehabilitation process seemed to drag on longer than expected. At the '95 Grand Prix, Ana just wasn't playing well. Her hitting didn't have the same sting to it as before, and she began missing too many jump serves, as if she were eager to make up for her lackluster front row performance by stacking up on the aces. Bernardinho didn't substitute her much, maybe because he thought it was just a matter of her clicking with herself and recapturing her former level. But in the GP semifinal against Cuba, not only did the rivalry continue, but ghosts of the '94 World's began to loom over Ana Moser. It seemed like she couldn't hit against Cuba at all, because Marlenys Costa and Carvajal kept blocking her time and again, and Ana didn't vary her hitting for some odd reason. Fernanda began to go more to her opposite hitter, Márcia and her middle hitters in slides which worked well. But Ana Moser's underperformance was worrisome. Even though she did pound match point by hitting the only line-shot of the match, Ana just wasn't there. They went on to lose the final against a surprising team from the USA in five sets, but they set their hopes on Atlanta and the challenges that they would face against the Cubans in the future. Atlanta went better for Ana Moser but still not at the level that she had hoped for. The reason the team did so well was because her teammates were now mature, experienced, and more serene. Hilma had learned to hit against high blocks, Ida and Ana Paula were directing their middle "one" balls very well, and Márcia was outstanding from anywhere on the court. And of course, the mastermind, Fernanda, was playing her third Olympics and she was in optimal shape. No longer the rookie, and considered by many to be the best setter in the world at the time, she had many options to go to in her offence besides Ana Moser. With such talent, Brazil outgunned all of its adversaries on their way to the semifinals, even defeating both Cuba and Russia in straight sets, an indication that this was Brazil's turn to win the gold. But fate can be cruel, and for both the USA and Brazil, Cuba was not supposed to get in their way so soon in the tournament! By losing both matches against Brazil and Russia, Mireya and her bunch came in third in their pool and faced the hosts in the quarterfinals (wiped them out embarrasingly in three sets) and then faced Brazil in the semifinal. No one had foreseen such a top-level clash before the final, and for many it was the final. So here is where this article goes full circle to where it began. Whenever you talk to volleyball connoisseurs, the term "brawls [ENG], brigas [POR], broncas [ESP]" refers specifically to the aftermath of the Cuba-Brazil semifinal. The teams split the first four sets, with Brazil coming close to winning the match in the fourth set, but Cuba blocking surprise go-to hitter Virna Dias at key moments of that set. I say "surprise go-to hitter" because once again (ghosts of '94?) Ana Moser did not play at her level when faced with the team she wanted to beat the most. But before the team was left without a leading scorer, Virna stepped up and seized the occasion. Now that there was someone else to lean on, Ana and the rest of the players followed suit and played it to the bone, pushing more on heart and guts than on anything else. Aided by a rambunctious Brazilian torcida that yelled every insult known to mobs at the Cuban players, Brazil mustered up the courage to force a tie-break. But the Cuban team that was fighting for a spot in the final was a totally different team from the one that dropped 0-3 matches in pool play. Led by Mireya—who must've been fueled by the torcida's trash talking at her and her girls—the Cubans took the lead in the 5th set and put the pressure on Brazil. Fernanda made some poor choices which some Brazilians fault Márcia for, but Cuba gained a valuable advantage which was never recovered. At 14-12, it was appropriately Mireya who got the last laugh with a kill that would've hit Márcia in the face had she not protected it. And with that, the fight began. All the Cubans, like a pack of wild hyenas, dashed to the net behind Mireya who was on one knee hitting the net at the harried Brazilians. With both Reglas on either side of her, Mireya and her teammates expressed their joy (a right that they were absolutely entitled to exercise) but in a rabid sort of way. Immediately when Ana Moser saw that the Cubans were showing no respect for their opponents, she defiantly went right up to where Mireya was and grabbed the net whilst pointing her finger and shouting, "Respeto! Res-pe-to!" in Spanish. When the other Brazilians saw that Ana was up there all by herself they flew to back her up, ready to rumble. Magaly Carvajal knew what had just been ignited (by the way, where were the referees in all this?) and she quickly went to the front of the Cuban line and opened her 3-metre armspan to contain her teammates from crossing under the net. But Má rcia beat her to it, going onto Cuban court after someone had insulted her. Carvajal's raised arm happened to be close to Márcia's face and she grabbed her by the throat and pushed her back to her side! Then Léila stood up for Márcia and provoked the Cubans and so on and so on, the brawls began and continued for several minutes. There was concern that the numerous Brazilian fans might jump in to defend their girls, which probably would've triggered even further violence, but luckily they didn't. Nevertheless, in the locker rooms things continued, and rumour has it that Regla Torres and Ana Paula got into a fight. I remember seeing part of the footage when, amid the mess of players, coaches, reporters, camerapeople, and Olympic volunteer staff mixed in to provide a buffer between the irate teams, I saw Ana Moser slipping through the buffer and going right into a circle of Cubans to talk things out diplomatically. I don't know what was the tone of her voice when she talked but she seemed to want to cool things off by peacefully approaching some of the more civilised Cuban players. To what extent her efforts worked, I don't know, but the way she seemed to handle the situation (at least from the TV spectator's point of view) it became a second chapter of heroics. Eventually, some days later she recovered from this painful experience and took her team to a narrow victory over Russia for the bronze, the medal that eluded them in Barcelona. At least now they had something to take home, even though that medal will always remind her of the bitter chapter that was Atlanta. Some months later, at the '96 Grand Prix, Brazil defeated Cuba in the semifinal and once again there were brawls between the two teams, this time ignited by Ana Paula. Regla Torres went as far as running around the Brazilian court after the match looking for someone to punch! The FIVB got strict about these displays of un-sportspersonly conduct and suspended two Brazilian and two Cuban players after that match. Brazil did go on to win the GP by defeating Russia in 5 sets with an underwomanned team due to suspensions and injuries (two of which I think were Ana Moser and Hilma). From there until '98, Ana Moser saw little playing time with the National Team and instead focused on her club in Brazil to stay in shape and not be far away from her home (trainer's recommendations?). It was at the '98 World Championships in Japan that Ana completed her trilogy of heroics. With a team that was not really cohesive enough to beat major powers such as Cuba and Russia, Brazil finished a disappointing fourth, despite good performances by Virna and on and off playing by Léila. The team was being renewed once again by younger players, but for these Championships, Bernardinho preferred to go back with the experienced players and the combination didn't exactly bring the desired results. In the relatively civil semifinal with Cuba (where Mireya played sporadically), Ana Moser had one of the best matches of her career. She finally seemed to have brushed off the ghosts of '94, because she was jump serving to perfection, hitting from the outside intelligently, from the back row with enormous strength and re-assuming the role of team leader and scorer. Her outstanding performance probably made the 1-3 loss a bit less painful to bear. When one loses playing his/her best, it's hard to blame oneself and easier to credit the opponent. With a similarly awesome performance in the third place match against Russia, Ana Moser ended the tournament with her head held high despite another loss. Ana stayed with the team through the '99 World Cup, with the aim of reaching the Sydney 2000 Olympics and become the only woman in history to have played in four Olympic Games ('88, '92, '96, and 2000), but unfortunately her knee gave in somewhere during the tournament and she sadly came to the conclusion that her time was up. It was especially sad that her last match against Cuba saw a resurgence of those pesky ghosts, when she squandered a lead to take the first set and gave it to the Cubans. But clearly Ana Moser wasn't physically at her best, though she was providing all the new players (Elisangela, Erika, Karin, Raquel) with experienced teammate support. In this sense, Ana Moser has been a very complete player, doing her job on the court in more ways than just playing. She's a mentor, a good teammate, a fierce competitor, and as she's proven to her fans by answering their fanmail, a good idol! I had the honour of receiving a reply from her in which she explained a bit of the grief over Cuba, her experience playing with the All-Star Team in '91 (interestingly enough, alongside Mireya and Magaly Carvajal), and her faith in God. I will always cherish her uplifting words, and how she epressed herself modestly, not bragging about her achievements, but laying them out like something we can all learn from. Things like those are what constitute real role models. It was indicative of Ana Moser's stature among the great names in Brazilian sport history that when she retired the Brazilian volleyball community (aided by the sports-crazy private sector) held a match in her honour (Superliga All Stars versus Friends of Ana Moser), exhibiting high level volleyball with Ana Moser herself playing for one last time in front of her home crowd. I then saw her at the 2003 World Cup as Team Assistant to coach José Robert Guimar?es. What she is doing nowadays, I don't know. But surely, whenever I meet Brazilians anywhere in the world, I strike up conversation by mentioning Ana Moser, and their eyes light up and they instantly feel an excitement that I know of and about her. If they only knew that I have spent three hours writing this article in honour of a great player, one of my top ten of all times, and certainly the best that Brazil has ever known.

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charlize aragon
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Re: Ana Moser

Mensaje #2 por charlize aragon » 30 Dic 2013, 10:53

Simplemente hablando, Ana Beatriz Moser ha sido el más famoso y talentoso jugador de voleibol brasileño de las últimas dos décadas. Ella es a Brasil lo Mireya Luis fue a Cuba y Lang Ping será siempre el de China. Hay algunas otras analogías que son bastante en forma adecuada puesto que estos jugadores combinan el atractivo popular , un carácter fuerte , impresionantes habilidades de voleibol , y una inclinación natural hacia el liderazgo , todo bajo un mismo nombre. La historia de Ana Moser es bastante largo y muy interesante. Echa un vistazo a su propio sitio web personal para la historia completa (ver la sección de Links) . Pero por lo que mis impresiones de este jugador con talento se refiere, aquí están - en pocas palabras descomprimido ! Lo que más me acordaré de ella es la forma en que se enfrentó a los cubanos en Atlanta. El recuerdo de su valentía me dio un enorme respeto por ella, y no sólo porque ella se puso de pie para defender su dignidad maltratada , sino porque ella no pensó dos veces antes de hacerlo. La mayoría de sus compañeros de equipo no estaban seguros de cómo manejar la pérdida de lo que se acurrucaron juntos por la línea de la espalda en silencio, pero en una medida más audaz , Ana Moser fue directo a la línea de frente y se enfrentaron a sus demonios justo en sus caras. ¿Cuántas personas una pelea en frente de miles de espectadores en el Omni Coliseo , millones de televidentes sintonizaron a la semifinal, y más aún , en los Juegos Olímpicos de todos los lugares , donde seguramente el incidente haría a los anales de la historia ? Sin embargo , su reacción no me sorprendió por lo que he visto de este jugador brasileño con talento y su personalidad en la cancha : definitivamente no es el tipo de persona que quiere meterse. Recuerdo que en la final de los Campeonatos Sudamericanos de Clubes en Lima en el '94 o '95 ( donde interpretó a Colgate / S ? O Caetano contra L' Acqua di Fiori / Minas ) iba a mirarlo constantemente a alguien en el otro lado de la red, no sé realmente a quién. Cada vez que una llamada era obvio, pero los árbitros no lo vería , Ana Moser sería provocadoramente a levantar sus manos en este jugador como si le decía , " Vamos, admite que tocó el balón! ¿Qué? ¿Vas a fingir que no lo toca que ? usted quiere esto para conseguir desagradable ? porque puedo hacerlo desagradable si quieres ... " - ese tipo de actitud. Algunas personas podrían llamarlo arrogante, pero Ana Moser definitivamente sabía cómo hacer que ella se escucha en la cancha. Incluso entre sus compañeros de equipo , se pavoneaba por la cancha con una confianza que la hacía parecer casi varonil (no estoy diciendo esto de mala manera en absoluto), como un chico en busca de una pelea. Para los brasileños y los fans de Ana Moser en cualquier parte del mundo, esta confianza en sí mismo era irresistible , y todo el tiempo que no cruzó la línea en la intimidación francamente , se admiraba. Entonces, ¿cómo afectó esto a mi percepción de ella en Atlanta? Bueno, antes de Ana Moser era un jugador del calibre internacional , la rivalidad continental en América del Sur fue entre Brasil y mi país natal , Perú . Estos dos equipos se enfrentaron a cabo desde mediados de la década de 1960 , si no más atrás, y hasta finales de 1970 era bastante parejo . Pero los años 80 fueron en su mayoría peruanos , ganando los cinco títulos de esa década , pero una en Santo André , Brasil, en 1981. Hablando en general , estoy seguro de que cuando Ana Moser comenzó a ver las competiciones internacionales del voleibol que estaba bastante frustrado por el hecho de que Brasil no volvería a jugar su mejor contra el Perú , por alguna extraña razón . Los equipos brasileños de los años 80 fueron buenos equipos , creativo , deportivo, con agallas y con talento en abundancia en un país de 150 millones de personas , pero de alguna manera se sienten intimidados cuando se enfrentaron a Cecilia Tait and Company. Eso fue en los años 80. Ana Moser probablemente entró voleibol decidido a invertir el orden continental de las cosas ... Ella se levantó rápidamente a las filas del club al equipo Junior Nacional , y en el 87 se llevó a Brasil a su primer título mundial junior contra Corea del Sur . No recuerdo exactamente, pero mis amigos brasileños me dicen que Márcia y Fernanda también estaban en ese equipo. Ana Moser, fue el go-to hit en ese equipo Campeón del Mundo Junior. y con ese título mundial en su mano, ella sabía que tenía en ella para ganar muchos más en la división de adultos . Dos años después, en el '89 del Mundo Junior de , sus compañeros de equipo Marcia y Fernanda ganaron su segundo título Mundial Junior consecutivo, esta vez junto a Ana Flávia , Ericleia ( Filo ) , Kerly , y Fátima , pero su último partido fue más dura que la de '87 . Brasil se enfrentó a un equipo cubano con jugadores como Magaly Carvajal y Regla Bell, dos jugadores que iban a convertirse en adversarios del núcleo duro en apenas tres años de . Ana Moser no jugó en el Mundial de '89 porque estaba sobre el límite de edad, pero ella esperó ansiosamente la llegada de sus compañeros de equipo del mundo bi - campeón para que la Selección Nacional de adultos podría comenzar una importante actualización . En los '89 Campeonato Sudamericano en Curitiba , el entrenador Inaldo Manta ( o por lo menos creo que era él en ese momento) jugaron un poco con su formación a lo largo del torneo, la mezcla de las viejas y las nuevas generaciones para lograr una especie de simbiosis productiva. Hago hincapié en la diferencia entre los dos grupos porque aparte de Isabel Salgado (más tarde llamado el " Ana Moser de su generación " , en la adulación cronológico inverso ) , los jugadores de mayor edad no estaban realmente a la altura de los más jóvenes. Parece extraño decir eso, pero creo que si varios de los jugadores más jóvenes habían jugado , se habrían obtenido mejores resultados. En cambio , Brasil cayó un set contra Argentina y cayó de plano contra el Perú en la final. Ana Moser jugó en apenas un puñado de puntos en el partido, pero cada vez que atacó a ella golpear la bola realmente bien ! Benching ella, poniendo Vera Mossa en el exterior en su lugar, y teniendo Márcia y Ana Claudia juegan medio ( ? ) Parecía errores que un entrenador con demasiadas opciones estaba haciendo . Pero al menos los jugadores más jóvenes recibieron alguna experiencia real de juego , que es algo que el entrenador del Perú Hombre Bok Park no estaba haciendo nada en el otro lado de la red ... Con el tiempo , la renuencia del parque para poner sus subordinados a la prueba le costó la hegemonía continental. En los Juegos de Buena Voluntad '90 en Seattle , se hizo evidente para mí que el Brasil había superado a Perú . Para entonces Perú dependía cada vez más de bloqueador central y bateador estrella Gaby Pérez del Solar. En el partido por el tercer puesto , Brasil enfrentó a Perú por el tercer puesto y mostró algunas de voleibol realmente excepcional en los dos primeros sets. Nada estaba trabajando para el Perú , que eran lentos, atacaban directamente a los bloques de Ida y Ana Flávia , y los dos bateadores fuera , Ana Moser y Marcia , eran imparables . El entrenador brasileño , Inaldo Manta ( ahora estoy seguro de que era él) trajo Tina Lopes a por ella rapidez en medio ( a pesar de su no ser muy alto para un bloqueador central ) . Por la misma razón por la que se coloca Ida en medio, así setter Fernanda tenía un buen número de combinación rápida juega a correr en el medio, o los bateadores fuera de bucle dispara fuera , o Ana Moser a la última fila. Por desgracia, en el tercer set, Ana Flávia se hundió con un esguince de tobillo , y que cambió la dinámica del partido a favor de Perú . Los andinos ganaron juegos tres y cuatro , aprovechando un equipo brasileño desconcertada que estaba luchando por encontrarse de nuevo. En el tie -break, Perú subió a 14-11 y al parecer tenía el partido, la medalla de bronce , y una fiereza puntuada " ¡Todavía no! " en cualquier brasileño espera que ellos habían tomado la delantera en su rivalidad clásica . Pero si hubo un jugador que no iba a dejar que el destino juega sus cartas como de costumbre , ese jugador era Ana Moser . Un par de errores del Perú , y un techo clave por Márcia trajeron Brasil a 14. Pero la verdadera alma del equipo fue Ana, que recogió sus compañeros de equipo después de cada punto y los motivó a concentrarse, a esperar que el balón salga de Gaby , para cubrir cualquier dinks por Rosa , y para creer en sí mismos - Nosotros no tenemos nadado lo que va a morir en la playa! Ella trajo mayor confianza al equipo al estrellar un ángulo kill corte transversal para llegar al punto de partido . Si bien Perú llamó un tiempo fuera , Ana Moser sacó al equipo unido de nuevo, a lo que creo que el entrenador dejó hablar porque estaba realmente bombeando sus compañeros de equipo . Entonces Márcia servido , Perú atacó , y la pelota cayó en medio de dos jugadores peruanos como una burbuja. Los brasileños se volvieron locos . Acababan exorcizado uno de sus más grandes demonios , encontrando el coraje dentro de la unidad del equipo que no desempeño inferior en contra de su rival tradicional . Habían estado a punto de un resultado muy familiar , pero Ana Moser y la nueva generación brasileña rotundamente respondió: " ¡Nunca más! " A pesar de una puesta mediocre en el Campeonato Mundial de adultos en China, algunos meses más tarde, Ana Moser hizo un nombre por sí misma al ser galardonado con el premio a la Mejor Ataque del torneo, un gran honor dada su competencia china Lang Ping, Irina de la URSS Smirnova , de Cuba Mireya Luis , y de los EE.UU. Caren Kemner , entre otros bateadores talentosos . En los '91 Juegos Panamericanos de La Habana , dirigió de nuevo a sus compañeros de equipo para desplazar a Perú de su viaje habitual a la final, y en su lugar se enfrentó a Cuba en su propia cancha , en una noche típicamente cálido Caribe. Brasil no podía ganar , y en la derrota que reconoció algunas caras conocidas en el equipo cubano de las categorías inferiores que estaban lanzadas rápidamente a la élite del voleibol de clase mundial. La rivalidad cambiaría pronto de Perú a Cuba , pero en primer lugar , Ana Moser necesaria para demostrarse a sí misma una vez más que el Brasil había vencido a los fantasmas de los años 80 al derrotar a Perú para el atraque de América del Sur para los Juegos Olímpicos del 92 . Ayudó a que el partido se jugó en una masa viviente de todo color amarillo de un coliseo de Ibirapuera , S ? O Paulo , con una torcida que nunca dejó de animar, y un equipo que se había hecho más fuerte y más unido con cada partido . En un día que sin duda recordarán , Brasil derrotó a Perú en cuatro sets , y con eso, se ganó su boleto a los Juegos Olímpicos de Barcelona. No sólo había destronado a Brasil el Vice - campeón olímpico del '88 , pero tenían grandes expectativas dado el enorme talento que llevaban a España . Hubo un cambio importante , sin embargo, y que fue la contratación de Wadson Lima en lugar del ex entrenador Inaldo Manta , que se había suicidado y abandonó el duelo del equipo para lo que fue el trágico final de la vida de una persona buena . Esta experiencia dolorosa probablemente llevó al equipo incluso más cerca, porque el Barcelona vio más unidad brasileña de lo habitual (especialmente entre Hilma y Ana Moser , que tenía un tipo de Natalia - Cecilia rocosa de relación interna , como he oído ) . Aunque el coaching de Wadson Lima dejó mucho que desear ( en mi opinión) , el equipo hizo bien contra Holanda ( 3-1 ) y China ( 15-11 en el tie -break ) , pero no pudo derrotar a Cuba ( 1 - 3 ) . Aún así, se clasificó para los cuartos de final y derrotó a Japón en cuatro sets para entrar en las semifinales. El Equipo Unificado ( antigua Unión Soviética y actual Campeón Olímpico ), sin embargo , impidieron el paso de Brasil en la final en cuatro sets, y la medalla de bronce , los sudamericanos se enfrentaron a un EE.UU. desmoralizado , que estaban viniendo a la derecha de una derrota por 5 set para Cuba . Pero a pesar de que Brasil perdió a los EE.UU. en dos sets, la prensa usamericana tuvo mucho que decir acerca de la reproducción espectacular de Ana Moser . Le elogiaron como " el único brasileño con cualquier esperma " (no del todo cierto , pero todavía una observación digna de Ana ), y el jugador más fluidez bilingüe en su equipo ( una bendición para los periodistas vienen de tiempo para las conferencias de prensa ) . Sin duda , era el jugador más consistente en su equipo, y Fernanda mantuvo establecer sus balones fuera que Ana labrado , o se golpea abajo de la línea una y otra vez , como si Paula Weishoff ni siquiera estaban allí. Tomó coraje , sin duda , pero al final Elaina Oden y Caren Kemner tiene lo mejor de ella mediante el bloqueo de ella durante el match point . Aún así, Ana Moser fue nombrado el Mejor Servidor del torneo por su salto mortal servir que sólo mejoró con el tiempo. Ella brilló en Barcelona, ​​y el futuro para ella parecía Stardom lujo. Por desgracia , como le ocurre a muchos atletas , lesiones sobrevienen incluso los más aptos , y Ana Moser se vio obligado a dejar el juego por un tiempo . Brasil tuvo que ir al Grand Prix '93 y el Campeonato Sudamericano en Perú ese mismo año sin su bateador estrella . Un cuarto puesto en el Gran Premio y un segundo lugar en Perú mostraron lo valioso Ana Moser fue a su equipo . Si hubiera jugado , Brasil hubiera condecorado con medalla en el Gran Premio y probablemente habría ganado el título continental. Pero Ana Moser tuvo que esperar hasta el Gran Premio del año siguiente para mostrar al mundo que ella estaba de vuelta. Con la rodilla de Ana no dar sus problemas más, y con una nueva y mucho mejor entrenador Bernardo Rezende ( la Bernardinho popular) , Brasil tenía un incentivo adicional para llevar a cabo extra- bien en el Mundial '94 que se estaban presentando . Ganar el '94 GP ayudó a aumentar la confianza de Brasil , a pesar de que derrotó a una escuadra Mireya -less cubana. Con todos los jugadores brasileños en forma óptima, el nivel de emoción dentro del equipo y el país a niveles extraordinarios , y un entrenador que revigorizado el equipo con elementos de algunos hombres dinámicos y más creatividad que su predecesor nunca se aventuró en , Brasil estaba seguro de que que sería medalla y medalla también. El '94 Mundial fue una competencia muy emocionante (a excepción de los partidos cubanos que todo terminó en dos sets apabullantes ) . Brasil enfrentó una competencia de Corea del Sur- la sorpresa semifinalista , pero luego llega fácilmente a la semifinal contra un joven alto equipo ruso , , kasha alimentado que aplastó bolas creadas 20 metros en el aire. Las esperanzas de llegar a la final casi se desvanecieron cuando Rusia tomó una ventaja de 2-1 y se disparó hacia arriba en el cuarto , pero luego la máquina brasileña lentamente comenzó la molienda, y con la ayuda de la torcida (también conocido como " el séptimo jugador " en Brasil ) Ana Moser and Company se despertaron de la amenaza de una posible derrota y dominaron por completo el partido a partir de ahí . Instrumental en este regreso fue Fernanda , quien comenzó a distribuir conjuntos muy bien con el fin de evadir el bloque ruso de alto. Ana Moser completado el proceso de convertirse en un héroe nacional en ese partido , porque ella envió Brasil y el coliseo de Ibirapuera en un frenesí golpeando kill después de matar hasta el final del partido. Era increíble cómo incluso bump establecer hacia atrás, conjuntos de Fernanda fue perfectamente a Ana que no tuvo dificultad golpeando la pelota de tenis de Rusia. Una de las bolas incluso golpeó el pie de Rusia Valentina Ogienko sin el jugador experimentado ni siquiera tener tiempo para reaccionar ! Con este nivel de confianza , Brasil entró en la final frente a Cuba un equipo muy vigorizado . Los recuerdos de la final, sin embargo, se eclipsan aquellos maravillosos de la semifinal contra Rusia. Cuba nunca le dio a Brasil la oportunidad , a excepción de algunas secuencias en el segundo set, y literalmente azotó los anfitriones con un piso de 3-0. Carvajal era un monstruo en la red, bloqueando Hilma cosas más de las veces , Ana Moser desde la última fila , accesos rápidos medios de Ana Paula , y Edna para el punto de campeonato. El papel go-to bateador se movió, de Ana Moser a Márcia y más tarde a Ana Flávia con sus diapositivas eficaces. Pero el sentimiento de impotencia visiblemente molesta Ana Moser . Aquí ella estaba en el centro del escenario en su propio país, y lo único que veía eran las armas cubanas en el horizonte. Esto era muy inusual de un bateador valiente como ella, pero de alguna manera los cubanos podía leer todos sus movimientos , y frente a una multitud vestidos de amarillo , Cuba ganó su segundo título mundial desde el 78 de Leningrado. Había indicios de una rivalidad naciente en este partido porque después de cada muerte , capitán Mireya quedaba mirando sus oponentes y les gritan . Pronto capitán Ana Flávia empezó a hacer lo mismo en represalia . El árbitro tuvo que hablar con los capitanes de ambos para calmar los ánimos , pero la rivalidad ya se había desencadenado , y Ana Moser no le gustaba lo que estaba viendo. Es cierto que Cuba era impecable en este torneo por no perder un solo set, pero que no le gustaba el hecho de que estaban provocando los brasileños de manera despectiva . Esta noche en S ? O Paulo se convirtió en un asunto pendiente para Ana Moser . Desde el '94 Mundial de los Juegos Olímpicos de Atlanta , algo que no fue el adecuado para Ana Moser . Ella se vio obstaculizada por más lesiones y su proceso de rehabilitación parecía prolongarse más de lo previsto . En el Gran Premio del 95, Ana no estaba jugando bien . Su bateo no tenía la misma picadura a ella como antes, y ella comenzó a falta demasiados salto sirve , como si estuviera ansioso por compensar por su actuación en primera fila mediocre apilando en los ases. Bernardinho no sustituyó a su mucho , tal vez porque pensó que era sólo una cuestión de su clic con ella y volver a capturar a su nivel anterior. Pero en la semifinal GP contra Cuba , no sólo la rivalidad continuará, pero los fantasmas de los '94 Mundial comenzó a cernirse sobre Ana Moser . Parecía que no podía golpear contra Cuba en absoluto, porque Marlenys Costa y Carvajal mantuvieron bloqueando su tiempo y otra vez, y Ana no variaron su golpear por alguna extraña razón . Fernanda comenzó a ir más a su bateador contrario , Márcia y sus bateadores medias en las diapositivas que funcionaba bien . Pero los bajos resultados de Ana Moser era preocupante . A pesar de que hizo un punto de partido libras por golpear a la única línea de tiro del partido , Ana no estaba allí . Se llegó a perder la final contra un equipo sorprendente de los EE.UU. en cinco sets , pero pusieron sus esperanzas en Atlanta y los desafíos que enfrentarían contra los cubanos en el futuro. Atlanta fue mejor para Ana Moser no , pero todavía en el nivel que ella había esperado . La razón por la que el equipo lo hizo bien fue porque sus compañeros de equipo estaban ahora madura , con experiencia, y más serena. Hilma había aprendido a golpear contra los altos bloques , Ida y Ana Paula estaban dirigiendo su medio " uno " bolas muy bien , y Márcia era excepcional desde cualquier lugar en la cancha. Y, por supuesto , el cerebro , Fernanda, estaba jugando su tercera Juegos Olímpicos y ella estaba en un estado óptimo. Ya no es el novato , y considerado por muchos como el mejor acomodador en el mundo en ese momento , no tenía muchas opciones para ir a en su ofensiva , además de Ana Moser . Con tanto talento , Brasil en potencia de fuego a todos sus adversarios en su camino a las semifinales, incluso derrotando a Cuba y Rusia en sets corridos , una indicación de que este fue el turno de Brasil para ganar el oro . Pero el destino puede ser cruel , y por tanto en los EE.UU. y Brasil , Cuba no se supone que en su camino tan pronto en el torneo! Al perder los dos partidos contra Brasil y Rusia , Mireya y su grupo quedó en tercer lugar en su grupo y se enfrentaron a los anfitriones en los cuartos de final ( los ha secado a cabo embarrasingly en tres sets ) y luego se enfrentaron a Brasil en la semifinal. Nadie había previsto ese choque de alto nivel antes de la final , y para muchos fue el final. Así que aquí es donde este artículo va al punto de partida de donde comenzó. Cada vez que usted habla con los conocedores de voleibol, el término " reyertas [ENG] , Brigas [ POR] , broncas [ ESP ] " se refiere específicamente a las secuelas de la semifinal entre Cuba y Brasil . Los equipos se repartieron los cuatro primeros sets, con Brasil que viene cerca de ganar el partido en el cuarto set , pero Cuba sorpresa bloqueando go-to hitter Virna Dias en los momentos clave de ese conjunto. Digo " sorpresa go-to hitter ", porque una vez más ( fantasmas del '94 ? ) Ana Moser no jugaron a su nivel cuando se enfrenta con el equipo que quería vencer a la mayoría. Pero antes de que el equipo se quedó sin un anotador , Virna se adelantó y aprovechó la ocasión . Ahora que había alguien más que apoyarse, Ana y el resto de los jugadores hicieron lo mismo y se reproducen hasta los huesos , empujando más en el corazón y las tripas que en cualquier otra cosa. Ayudado por una torcida brasileña bravucón que le gritó todos los insultos conocidos por las turbas en los jugadores cubanos , Brasil reunió el valor necesario para forzar un tie-break. Pero el equipo cubano que estaba luchando por un puesto en la final fue un equipo totalmente diferente de la que cayó 0-3 partidos en el juego de grupo . Liderados por Mireya - que debe haber sido alimentados por la basura de la torcida hablar de ella y sus hijas - los cubanos tomaron la delantera en el quinto set y poner la presión sobre Brasil . Fernanda hizo algunas malas decisiones que algunos brasileños culpa Márcia para , pero Cuba ha subido de valiosa ventaja que nunca se recuperó. En 14-12 , fue apropiadamente Mireya que consiguió el último en reír con una matanza que han golpeado Márcia en la cara que no la había protegido . Y con eso, la lucha comenzó . Todos los cubanos, como una manada de hienas salvajes , corrió hacia la red detrás de Mireya que estaba en una de sus rodillas golpear la red a los brasileños apresurados . Con ambos Reglas a cada lado de ella, Mireya y sus compañeros de equipo expresaron su alegría (un derecho que estaban absolutamente facultados para ejercer ), sino en una especie de manera rabiosa . Inmediatamente cuando Ana Moser vio que los cubanos estaban mostrando ningún respeto por sus oponentes , en tono desafiante fue hasta donde estaba Mireya y agarró a la red , mientras que señala su dedo y gritando: "¡ Respeto ! Res -pe -to ! " en español . Cuando los otros brasileños vieron que Ana estaba allí completamente sola volaron a respaldarla , preparado para arrasar . Magaly Carvajal sabía lo que acababa de ser encendido (por cierto , ¿dónde estaban los árbitros en todo esto? ) Y rápidamente se dirigió a la parte delantera de la línea cubana y abrió la extensión de los brazos de 3 metros para contener sus compañeros de equipo desde el cruce debajo de la red . Pero Má RCIA se le adelantó , va a la cancha de Cuba después de que alguien la había insultado . Brazo levantado de Carvajal pasó a estar cerca de la cara de Márcia y ella la agarró por el cuello y la empujó de nuevo a su lado ! Luego se puso de pie para Leila Márcia y provocó a los cubanos y así sucesivamente y así sucesivamente, las peleas comenzaron y continuaron durante varios minutos . Existe la preocupación de que los numerosos aficionados brasileños podrían saltar en defensa de sus niñas, que probablemente se han desencadenado aún más violencia , pero por suerte no lo hicieron. Sin embargo , en los vestuarios cosas continuado , y se rumorea que Regla Torres y Ana Paula se enzarzaron en una pelea. Recuerdo haber visto una parte de las imágenes , cuando , en medio de la confusión de los jugadores , entrenadores, periodistas, camarógrafos y personal voluntario olímpico mezclado para proporcionar un amortiguador entre los equipos iracundos , vi a Ana Moser deslizarse a través de la memoria intermedia y va a la derecha en un círculo de los cubanos a hablar las cosas con diplomacia . No sé cuál era el tono de su voz cuando hablaba , pero ella parecía querer enfriar las cosas pacíficamente acercándose algunos de los jugadores cubanos más civilizados. ¿En qué medida trabajaban sus esfuerzos, no lo sé , pero la forma en que ella parecía manejar la situación (por lo menos desde el punto de vista del espectador de TV ) se convirtió en un segundo capítulo de heroísmo . Con el tiempo , algunos días más tarde se recuperó de esta experiencia dolorosa y tomó a su equipo a una victoria por la mínima ante Rusia por el bronce , la medalla que se les escapó en Barcelona. Por lo menos ahora tenían algo para llevar a casa , a pesar de que esa medalla siempre le recordará del capítulo amargo que era Atlanta. Algunos meses más tarde, en el Gran Premio el 96, Brasil derrotó a Cuba en la semifinal y una vez más no hubo peleas entre los dos equipos , esta vez encendida por Ana Paula . Regla Torres llegó al extremo de correr alrededor de la cancha después del partido de Brasil en busca de alguien para golpear ! La FIVB tiene estrictos con estas muestras de Conducta de la ONU - sportspersonly y suspendió dos dos jugadores cubanos de Brasil y después de ese partido. Brasil hizo ir a ganar el GP al derrotar a Rusia en 5 sets con un equipo underwomanned debido a suspensiones y lesiones ( dos de los cuales creo que eran Ana Moser y Hilma ) . Desde allí hasta el 98, Ana Moser vio poco tiempo de juego con la Selección Nacional y en su lugar se centró en su club en Brasil para mantenerse en forma , y no estar muy lejos de su casa ( las recomendaciones del entrenador ? ) . Fue en el Mundial '98 en Japón que Ana completó su trilogía de heroísmo . Con un equipo que en realidad no era lo suficientemente cohesionada para vencer a grandes potencias como Cuba y Rusia , Brasil terminó en un decepcionante cuarto , a pesar de las buenas actuaciones de Virna y dentro y fuera de jugar por Leila . El equipo se va renovando una vez más por los jugadores más jóvenes , pero para estos Campeonatos , Bernardinho prefirió volver con los jugadores experimentados y la combinación no trajo exactamente los resultados deseados. En la semifinal relativamente civil en Cuba (donde Mireya jugó esporádicamente ), Ana Moser tenía uno de los mejores partidos de su carrera. Por fin parecía haber cepillado fuera los fantasmas del '94 , porque era salto servir a la perfección , llegando desde el exterior de forma inteligente , desde la última fila con enorme fuerza y volver a asumir el papel de líder del equipo y máximo goleador . Su destacada actuación hizo probablemente la pérdida 1-3 un poco menos doloroso de soportar. Cuando uno pierde jugando su / su mejor momento, es difícil culpar a sí mismo y más fácil de acreditar al oponente. Con un rendimiento similar impresionante en el tercer puesto contra Rusia , Ana Moser terminó el torneo con la cabeza bien alta a pesar de otra derrota . Ana se quedó con el equipo a través de la Copa del Mundo '99 , con el objetivo de llegar a los Juegos Olímpicos de Sydney 2000 y convertirse en la única mujer en la historia que ha jugado en cuatro Juegos Olímpicos ( '88 , '92 , '96 y 2000 ) , pero lamentablemente su rodilla cedió en algún momento durante el torneo y que por desgracia llegó a la conclusión de que su tiempo había terminado . Fue especialmente triste que su último partido contra Cuba vio un resurgimiento de esos molestos fantasmas , cuando desperdició una ventaja para llevarse el primer set y se lo dio a los cubanos. Pero está claro que Ana Moser no estaba físicamente en su mejor momento , a pesar de que estaba proporcionando a todos los nuevos jugadores ( Elisangela , Erika , Karin , Raquel ) , con el apoyo compañero de equipo con experiencia. En este sentido , Ana Moser ha sido un jugador muy completo, haciendo su trabajo en la cancha de más maneras que sólo jugar . Ella es un mentor, un buen compañero de equipo , un competidor feroz, y como ella ha demostrado a sus fans , respondiendo a su Fanmail , un buen ídolo ! Tuve el honor de recibir una respuesta de ella en la que explicó un poco el dolor por Cuba , su experiencia de jugar con el Equipo de las Estrellas en el 91 ( curiosamente, junto a Mireya y Magaly Carvajal ) , y su fe en Dios . Que siempre recordaremos sus palabras edificantes , y cómo ella misma epressed modestamente , no alardear de sus logros, pero lo dejó suelto como algo que todos podemos aprender. Cosas como esas son las que constituyen verdaderos modelos a seguir . Fue indicativa de la talla de Ana Moser entre los grandes nombres de la historia del deporte brasileño, que cuando se retiró de la comunidad de voleibol brasileño ( ayudado por el sector privado con el deporte locas ) celebró un partido en su honor ( Superliga All Stars contra Amigos de Ana Moser ) , exhibiendo voleibol de alto nivel con Ana Moser sí misma jugando por última vez delante de su afición. Entonces la vi en la Copa Mundial de 2003 como Ayudante de equipo para entrenar a José Roberto Guimar ? Es . Lo que está haciendo hoy en día, no lo sé . Pero, sin duda , cada vez que me encuentro con los brasileños en cualquier parte del mundo, yo entablo conversación mencionando Ana Moser, y sus ojos se iluminan y al instante siento una emoción , que yo sepa , y por ella. Si supieran que he pasado tres horas escribiendo este artículo en honor a un gran jugador, uno de mis diez mejores de todos los tiempos , y sin duda el mejor que Brasil haya conocido jamás.

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PEPERALPH
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Re: ARTÍCULO SOBRE ANA MOSER

Mensaje #3 por PEPERALPH » 23 Jun 2015, 15:38

cuba escribió:Un articulo en Ingles sobre Ana Moser y su historia.

http://bbs.sjtu.edu.cn/bbstcon?board=volleyball&reid=1186665480

Simply speaking, Ana Beatriz Moser has been the most famous and talented Brazilian volleyball player of the last two decades. She is to Brazil what Mireya Luis was to Cuba and Lang Ping will always be to China. There are few other analogies that are quite as appropriate because these players combined popular appeal, a strong character, impressive volleyball skills, and a natural inclination towards leadership, all under one name. Ana Moser's story is quite long and quite interesting. Check out her own personal website for the complete story (see the Links section). But as far as my impressions of this talented player go, here they are—in a decompressed nutshell! What I will most remember about her is the way she faced the Cubans in Atlanta. The memory of her bravery gave me enormous respect for her, and not only because she stood up to uphold her battered dignity, but because she didn't think twice about doing it. Most of her teammates were unsure of how to handle the loss so they huddled together by the back line in silence, but in a most daring move, Ana Moser went straight to the front line and faced her demons right in their faces. How many people pick a fight in front of thousands of spectators at the Omni Colliseum, millions of TV viewers tuned in to the semifinal, and even more so, at the Olympic Games of all places, where surely the incident would make it into the annals of history? However, her reaction didn't surprise me from what I've seen of this talented Brazilian player and her on-court personality: she's definitely not the type of person you want to mess with. I remember that in the finals of the South American Club Championships in Lima in '94 or '95 (where she played for Colgate/S?o Caetano against L'Acqua di Fiori/Minas) she would constantly glare at someone on the other side of the net, I don't know really at who. Whenever a call was obvious but the referees wouldn't see it, Ana Moser would provokingly lift her hands at this player as if telling her, "Come on, admit you touched the ball! What? Are you gonna pretend you didn't touch it? You want this to get nasty? 'cause I can make it nasty if you want to..."—that type of attitude. Some people might call it arrogant, but Ana Moser definitely knew how to make herself be heard on the court. Even amongst her teammates, she strutted around the court with a confidence that made her seem almost manly (I'm not saying this in a bad way at all), like a boy looking for a fight. For Brazilians and fans of Ana Moser anywhere in the world, this self-confidence was irresistible, and as long as she didn't cross the line into downright bullying, it was admired. So how did this affect my perception of her at Atlanta? Well, before Ana Moser was a player of international caliber, the continental rivalry in South America was between Brazil and my home country, Peru. These two teams battled it out since the mid-1960s, if not further back, and until the late 1970s it was quite even. But the '80s were mostly Peruvian, winning all five titles of that decade but one in Santo André, Brazil, in 1981. Speaking in general, I'm sure that when Ana Moser began watching international volleyball competitions she was quite frustrated at the fact that Brazil would never play its best against Peru, for some bizarre reason. The Brazilian teams of the '80s were good teams, creative, athletic, gutsy, and with talent aplenty in a country of 150 million people, but somehow they were intimidated whenever they faced Cecilia Tait and Company. That was back in the '80s. Ana Moser probably entered volleyball determined to reverse the continental order of things... She quickly rose up the ranks from club to Junior National Team, and in '87 she led Brazil to its first World Junior title against South Korea. I don't remember exactly but my Brazilian friends tell me that Márcia and Fernanda were also on that team. Ana Moser, was the go-to hitter in that Junior World Champion team. and with that world title in her hand, she knew she had it in her to win many more in the Adult division. Two years later at the '89 Junior World's, her teammates Márcia and Fernanda won a second consecutive Junior World title, this time alongside Ana Flávia, Ericleia (Filo), Kerly, and Fátima, but their final match was tougher than that of '87. Brazil faced a Cuban team with players such as Magaly Carvajal and Regla Bell, two players who were to become hard core adversaries in just three year's time. Ana Moser didn't play at the '89 World's because she was over the age limit, but she waited eagerly for the arrival of her world bi-champion teammates so that the Adult National Team could begin a major upgrade. At the '89 South American Championships in Curitiba, coach Inaldo Manta (or at least I believe it was him at the time) played around with his lineup throughout the tournament, mixing the old and new generations to achieve a sort of productive symbiosis. I stress the difference between the two groups because other than Isabel Salgado (later on called the "Ana Moser of her generation", in converse chronological adulation), the older players weren't really at a par with the younger ones. It seems odd to say that, but I think that if more of the younger players had played, they would've obtained better results. Instead, Brazil dropped a set against Argentina and fell flat against Peru in the final. Ana Moser played for barely a handful of points in the match, but whenever she attacked she would hit the ball really well! Benching her, putting Vera Mossa on the outside instead, and having Márcia and Ana Claudia play middle (??) seemed like mistakes that a coach with too many options was making. But at least the younger players got some real experience playing, which is something Peru's coach Man Bok Park was not doing at all on the other side of the net... Eventually, Park's reluctance to put his juniors to the test cost him the continental hegemony. At the '90 Goodwill Games in Seattle, it became clear to me that Brazil had surpassed Peru. By then Peru depended more and more on middle blocker and star hitter Gaby Pérez del Solar. In the match for third place, Brazil faced Peru for third place and showed some really exceptional volleyball in the first two sets. Nothing was working for Peru, they were sluggish, they were hitting straight into the blocks of Ida and Ana Flávia, and the two outside hitters, Ana Moser and Márcia, were unstoppable. The Brazilian coach, Inaldo Manta (now I'm sure it was him) brought Tina Lopes back for her quickness at middle (despite her not being very tall for a middle blocker). For the same reason he placed Ida at middle, so setter Fernanda had quite a number of fast combination plays to run in the middle, or the outside hitters in looped shoots outside, or Ana Moser to the back row. Unfortunately in the third set, Ana Flávia went down with a sprained ankle and that shifted the momentum of the match in favour of Peru. The Andeans won sets three and four, taking advantage of a disconcerted Brazilian team that was struggling to find itself again. In the tie-break, Peru went up to 14-11 and apparently had the match, the bronze medal, and a fiercely punctuated "Not yet!" at any Brazilian hopes that they had taken the lead in their classic rivalry. But if there was one player who wasn't going to let fate play its cards out as usual, that player was Ana Moser. A couple of Peruvian mistakes, and a key roof by Márcia brought Brazil to 14. But the real soul of the team was Ana, who gathered her teammates after every point and motivated them to concentrate, to expect the ball to go to Gaby, to cover any dinks by Rosa, and to believe in themselves—We haven't swum so far to die on the beach! She brought added confidence to the team by slamming a very angled cross court kill to get to match point. While Peru called a time-out, Ana Moser pulled the team together again, to which I think the coach let her speak for she was really pumping her teammates. Then Márcia served, Peru attacked, and the ball fell in between two Peruvian players like a bubble. The Brazilians went wild. They had just exorcised one of their greatest demons, finding the guts within the unity of the team to not underperform against their traditional rival. They had been on the verge of an all too familiar outcome, but Ana Moser and the new Brazilian generation resoundingly replied, "Not anymore!" Despite a mediocre placing at the Adult World Championships in China some months later, Ana Moser made a name for herself by being awarded a prize for the Best Attack of the tournament, a great honour indeed given her competition: China's Lang Ping, the USSR's Irina Smirnova, Cuba's Mireya Luis, and the USA's Caren Kemner, among other very talented hitters. At the '91 Pan-American Games in Havana, she again led her teammates to displace Peru from their usual trip to the final, and instead faced Cuba on their home court, on a typically hot Caribbean night. Brazil couldn't win it, and in the defeat they recognised some familiar faces in the Cuban team from the Junior ranks that were quickly racing to the élite of world-class volleyball. The rivalry would shift soon from Peru to Cuba, but first, Ana Moser needed to prove to herself once again that Brazil had vanquished those ghosts from the '80s by defeating Peru for the South American berth to the '92 Olympics. It helped that the match was played in an all-yellow living mass of a coliseum in Ibirapuera, S?o Paulo, with a torcida that never stopped cheering, and a team that had grown stronger and more united with every match. On a day they will surely remember, Brazil defeated Peru in four sets, and with that, earned their ticket to the Olympic Games in Barcelona. Not only had Brazil dethroned the Olympic Vice-champion from '88, but they had high expectations given the enormous talent they were taking to Spain. There was one major change, though, and that was the hiring of Wadson Lima in place of former coach Inaldo Manta, who had committed suicide and left the team grieving for what was the tragic end of a good person's life. This painful experience probably brought the team even closer together, because Barcelona saw more Brazilian unity than usual (especially between Hilma and Ana Moser, who had a rocky Natalia—Cecilia type of internal relationship, as I heard). Though Wadson Lima's coaching left a lot to be desired (in my opinion), the team did well against The Netherlands (3-1) and China (15-11 in the tie-break), but couldn't defeat Cuba (1-3). Still, they qualified for the quarterfinals and defeated Japan in four sets to go into the semifinals. The Unified Team (former USSR and defending Olympic Champion) however, impeded Brazil's passage into the finals in four sets, and in the bronze medal, the South Americans faced a demoralised USA, who were coming right off a 5 set loss to Cuba. But even though Brazil lost to the USA in straight sets, the USAmerican press had much to say about Ana Moser's spectacular playing. They praised her as "the only Brazilian with any spunk" (not entirely true but still a worthy observation for Ana), and the most fluently bilingual player on her team (a blessing for reporters come time for press conferences). Surely, she was the most consistent player on her team, and Fernanda kept setting her high outside balls which Ana tooled, or hit down the line again and again, as if Paula Weishoff weren't even there. It took guts, definitely, but in the end Elaina Oden and Caren Kemner got the best of her by blocking her for match point. Still, Ana Moser was named the Best Server of the tournament for her deadly jump serve which only got better with time. She shone in Barcelona, and the future for her looked like Stardom deluxe. Unfortunately, as happens to many athletes, injuries befall even the fittest, and Ana Moser was forced to leave the game for a while. Brazil had to go to the '93 Grand Prix and the South American Championship in Peru that same year without its star hitter. A fourth place at the GP and a second place in Peru showed how valuable Ana Moser was to her team. Had she played, Brazil would've medaled at the GP and probably would've won the continental title. But Ana Moser had to wait until the following year's Grand Prix to show the world that she was back. With Ana's knee not giving her problems anymore, and with a new and much better coach in Bernardo Rezende (the popular Bernardinho), Brazil had an added incentive to perform extra-well at the '94 World Championships that they were hosting. Winning the '94 GP helped boost Brazil's confidence, even though they defeated a Mireya-less Cuban squad. With all the Brazilian players in optimal shape, the excitement level within the team and the country at extraordinary levels, and a coach that re-invigorated the team with some dynamic men's elements and more creativity than his predecessor ever ventured into, Brazil was sure that it would medal and medal well. The '94 World's was a very exciting competition (except for the Cuban matches which all ended in pummelling straight sets). Brazil faced some competition from South Korea—the surprise semifinalist—but then easily reached the semifinal against a young, tall, kasha-fed Russian team that crushed balls set up 20 metres in the air. Hopes of reaching the final almost faded when Russia took a 2-1 lead and shot upwards in the 4th, but then the Brazilian machine slowly began grinding, and with the help of the torcida (also known as "the seventh player" in Brazil) Ana Moser and Company woke up from the menace of a possible defeat and completely dominated the match from there on. Instrumental in this comeback was Fernanda, who began distributing sets very well in order to evade the tall Russian block. Ana Moser completed the process of becoming a national hero in that match, for she sent Brazil and the colliseum in Ibirapuera into a frenzy by pounding kill after kill until the end of the match. It was incredible how even bump setting backwards, Fernanda's sets went perfectly to Ana who had no difficulty banging the ball on Russia's court. One of the balls even hit Russian Valentina Ogienko's foot without the experienced player even having time to react! With this level of confidence, Brazil went into the final versus Cuba a very invigorated team. Memories of the final, however, eclipse those wonderful ones from the semifinal against Russia. Cuba never gave Brazil a chance, save for some sequences in the second set, and it literally pummeled the hosts with a flat 3-0. Carvajal was a monster at the net, stuff blocking Hilma more times than not, Ana Moser from the back row, Ana Paula's quick middle hits, and Edna for championship point. The go-to hitter role shifted, from Ana Moser to Márcia and later to Ana Flávia with her effective slides. But the feeling of impotence visibly bothered Ana Moser. Here she was on centre stage in her own country, and all she could see were Cuban arms in the horizon. This was very uncharacteristic of a fearless hitter like her, but somehow the Cubans could read her every move, and in front of a yellow-clad crowd, Cuba won its second world title since '78 in Leningrad. There were inklings of a nascent rivalry in this match because after every kill, captain Mireya would stare her opponents down and yell at them. Soon captain Ana Flávia started doing the same in retaliation. The referee had to talk to both captains to calm things down, but the rivalry had already been triggered, and Ana Moser did not like what she was seeing. True, Cuba was flawless in this tournament by not losing a single set, but she didn't like the fact that they were provoking the Brazilians in such a disparaging way. This night in S?o Paulo became unfinished business for Ana Moser. From the '94 World's to the Atlanta Olympics, something didn't go right for Ana Moser. She was hindered by more injuries and her rehabilitation process seemed to drag on longer than expected. At the '95 Grand Prix, Ana just wasn't playing well. Her hitting didn't have the same sting to it as before, and she began missing too many jump serves, as if she were eager to make up for her lackluster front row performance by stacking up on the aces. Bernardinho didn't substitute her much, maybe because he thought it was just a matter of her clicking with herself and recapturing her former level. But in the GP semifinal against Cuba, not only did the rivalry continue, but ghosts of the '94 World's began to loom over Ana Moser. It seemed like she couldn't hit against Cuba at all, because Marlenys Costa and Carvajal kept blocking her time and again, and Ana didn't vary her hitting for some odd reason. Fernanda began to go more to her opposite hitter, Márcia and her middle hitters in slides which worked well. But Ana Moser's underperformance was worrisome. Even though she did pound match point by hitting the only line-shot of the match, Ana just wasn't there. They went on to lose the final against a surprising team from the USA in five sets, but they set their hopes on Atlanta and the challenges that they would face against the Cubans in the future. Atlanta went better for Ana Moser but still not at the level that she had hoped for. The reason the team did so well was because her teammates were now mature, experienced, and more serene. Hilma had learned to hit against high blocks, Ida and Ana Paula were directing their middle "one" balls very well, and Márcia was outstanding from anywhere on the court. And of course, the mastermind, Fernanda, was playing her third Olympics and she was in optimal shape. No longer the rookie, and considered by many to be the best setter in the world at the time, she had many options to go to in her offence besides Ana Moser. With such talent, Brazil outgunned all of its adversaries on their way to the semifinals, even defeating both Cuba and Russia in straight sets, an indication that this was Brazil's turn to win the gold. But fate can be cruel, and for both the USA and Brazil, Cuba was not supposed to get in their way so soon in the tournament! By losing both matches against Brazil and Russia, Mireya and her bunch came in third in their pool and faced the hosts in the quarterfinals (wiped them out embarrasingly in three sets) and then faced Brazil in the semifinal. No one had foreseen such a top-level clash before the final, and for many it was the final. So here is where this article goes full circle to where it began. Whenever you talk to volleyball connoisseurs, the term "brawls [ENG], brigas [POR], broncas [ESP]" refers specifically to the aftermath of the Cuba-Brazil semifinal. The teams split the first four sets, with Brazil coming close to winning the match in the fourth set, but Cuba blocking surprise go-to hitter Virna Dias at key moments of that set. I say "surprise go-to hitter" because once again (ghosts of '94?) Ana Moser did not play at her level when faced with the team she wanted to beat the most. But before the team was left without a leading scorer, Virna stepped up and seized the occasion. Now that there was someone else to lean on, Ana and the rest of the players followed suit and played it to the bone, pushing more on heart and guts than on anything else. Aided by a rambunctious Brazilian torcida that yelled every insult known to mobs at the Cuban players, Brazil mustered up the courage to force a tie-break. But the Cuban team that was fighting for a spot in the final was a totally different team from the one that dropped 0-3 matches in pool play. Led by Mireya—who must've been fueled by the torcida's trash talking at her and her girls—the Cubans took the lead in the 5th set and put the pressure on Brazil. Fernanda made some poor choices which some Brazilians fault Márcia for, but Cuba gained a valuable advantage which was never recovered. At 14-12, it was appropriately Mireya who got the last laugh with a kill that would've hit Márcia in the face had she not protected it. And with that, the fight began. All the Cubans, like a pack of wild hyenas, dashed to the net behind Mireya who was on one knee hitting the net at the harried Brazilians. With both Reglas on either side of her, Mireya and her teammates expressed their joy (a right that they were absolutely entitled to exercise) but in a rabid sort of way. Immediately when Ana Moser saw that the Cubans were showing no respect for their opponents, she defiantly went right up to where Mireya was and grabbed the net whilst pointing her finger and shouting, "Respeto! Res-pe-to!" in Spanish. When the other Brazilians saw that Ana was up there all by herself they flew to back her up, ready to rumble. Magaly Carvajal knew what had just been ignited (by the way, where were the referees in all this?) and she quickly went to the front of the Cuban line and opened her 3-metre armspan to contain her teammates from crossing under the net. But Má rcia beat her to it, going onto Cuban court after someone had insulted her. Carvajal's raised arm happened to be close to Márcia's face and she grabbed her by the throat and pushed her back to her side! Then Léila stood up for Márcia and provoked the Cubans and so on and so on, the brawls began and continued for several minutes. There was concern that the numerous Brazilian fans might jump in to defend their girls, which probably would've triggered even further violence, but luckily they didn't. Nevertheless, in the locker rooms things continued, and rumour has it that Regla Torres and Ana Paula got into a fight. I remember seeing part of the footage when, amid the mess of players, coaches, reporters, camerapeople, and Olympic volunteer staff mixed in to provide a buffer between the irate teams, I saw Ana Moser slipping through the buffer and going right into a circle of Cubans to talk things out diplomatically. I don't know what was the tone of her voice when she talked but she seemed to want to cool things off by peacefully approaching some of the more civilised Cuban players. To what extent her efforts worked, I don't know, but the way she seemed to handle the situation (at least from the TV spectator's point of view) it became a second chapter of heroics. Eventually, some days later she recovered from this painful experience and took her team to a narrow victory over Russia for the bronze, the medal that eluded them in Barcelona. At least now they had something to take home, even though that medal will always remind her of the bitter chapter that was Atlanta. Some months later, at the '96 Grand Prix, Brazil defeated Cuba in the semifinal and once again there were brawls between the two teams, this time ignited by Ana Paula. Regla Torres went as far as running around the Brazilian court after the match looking for someone to punch! The FIVB got strict about these displays of un-sportspersonly conduct and suspended two Brazilian and two Cuban players after that match. Brazil did go on to win the GP by defeating Russia in 5 sets with an underwomanned team due to suspensions and injuries (two of which I think were Ana Moser and Hilma). From there until '98, Ana Moser saw little playing time with the National Team and instead focused on her club in Brazil to stay in shape and not be far away from her home (trainer's recommendations?). It was at the '98 World Championships in Japan that Ana completed her trilogy of heroics. With a team that was not really cohesive enough to beat major powers such as Cuba and Russia, Brazil finished a disappointing fourth, despite good performances by Virna and on and off playing by Léila. The team was being renewed once again by younger players, but for these Championships, Bernardinho preferred to go back with the experienced players and the combination didn't exactly bring the desired results. In the relatively civil semifinal with Cuba (where Mireya played sporadically), Ana Moser had one of the best matches of her career. She finally seemed to have brushed off the ghosts of '94, because she was jump serving to perfection, hitting from the outside intelligently, from the back row with enormous strength and re-assuming the role of team leader and scorer. Her outstanding performance probably made the 1-3 loss a bit less painful to bear. When one loses playing his/her best, it's hard to blame oneself and easier to credit the opponent. With a similarly awesome performance in the third place match against Russia, Ana Moser ended the tournament with her head held high despite another loss. Ana stayed with the team through the '99 World Cup, with the aim of reaching the Sydney 2000 Olympics and become the only woman in history to have played in four Olympic Games ('88, '92, '96, and 2000), but unfortunately her knee gave in somewhere during the tournament and she sadly came to the conclusion that her time was up. It was especially sad that her last match against Cuba saw a resurgence of those pesky ghosts, when she squandered a lead to take the first set and gave it to the Cubans. But clearly Ana Moser wasn't physically at her best, though she was providing all the new players (Elisangela, Erika, Karin, Raquel) with experienced teammate support. In this sense, Ana Moser has been a very complete player, doing her job on the court in more ways than just playing. She's a mentor, a good teammate, a fierce competitor, and as she's proven to her fans by answering their fanmail, a good idol! I had the honour of receiving a reply from her in which she explained a bit of the grief over Cuba, her experience playing with the All-Star Team in '91 (interestingly enough, alongside Mireya and Magaly Carvajal), and her faith in God. I will always cherish her uplifting words, and how she epressed herself modestly, not bragging about her achievements, but laying them out like something we can all learn from. Things like those are what constitute real role models. It was indicative of Ana Moser's stature among the great names in Brazilian sport history that when she retired the Brazilian volleyball community (aided by the sports-crazy private sector) held a match in her honour (Superliga All Stars versus Friends of Ana Moser), exhibiting high level volleyball with Ana Moser herself playing for one last time in front of her home crowd. I then saw her at the 2003 World Cup as Team Assistant to coach José Robert Guimar?es. What she is doing nowadays, I don't know. But surely, whenever I meet Brazilians anywhere in the world, I strike up conversation by mentioning Ana Moser, and their eyes light up and they instantly feel an excitement that I know of and about her. If they only knew that I have spent three hours writing this article in honour of a great player, one of my top ten of all times, and certainly the best that Brazil has ever known.
Simplemente Magaly carvajal era superior a ella y nadie se emociona Tanto


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